Amarna Sunset: Nefertiti, Tutankhamun, Ay, Horemheb, and the Egyptian Counter-reformation

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Oxford University Press, 2009 - 207 pages
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This new study, drawing on the latest research, tells the story of the decline and fall of the pharaoh Akhenaten's religious revolution in the fourteenth century BC. Beginning at the regime's high-point in his Year 12, it traces the subsequent collapse that saw the deaths of many of the king's loved ones, his attempts to guarantee the revolution through co-rulers, and the last frenzied assault on the god Amun.
The book then outlines the events of the subsequent five decades that saw the extinction of the royal line, an attempt to place a foreigner on Egypt's throne, and the accession of three army officers in turn. Among its conclusions are that the mother of Tutankhamun was none other than Nefertiti, and that the queen was joint-pharaoh in turn with both her husband Akhenaten and her son. As such, she was herself instrumental in beginning the return to orthodoxy, undoing her erstwhile husband's life-work before her own mysterious disappearance.
 

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Contents

SUNRISE
1
1 The Noonday Sun
11
2 The Waning Sun
27
3 The Northern Problem
53
4 The Living Image of Amun
61
5 The Zananzash Affair
89
6 Gods Father to God
95
7 The Hawk in Festival
109
8 Sunset
135
NOTES
139
APPENDICES
163
BIBLIOGRAPHY
174
INDEX
198
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About the author (2009)


Aidan Dodson is a research fellow in the Department of Archaeology and Anthropology at the University of Bristol, UK, where he teaches Egyptology. He is the author of eleven books and over 200 reviews and articles.

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