British Science Fiction Film and Television: Critical Essays

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Tobias Hochscherf, James Leggott, Donald E. Palumbo
McFarland, Jan 10, 2014 - 237 pages
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Written by international experts from a range of disciplines, these essays examine the uniquely British contribution to science fiction film and television. Viewing British SF as a cultural phenomenon that challenges straightforward definitions of genre, nationhood, authorship and media, the editors provide a conceptual introduction placing the essays within their critical context. Essay topics include Hammer science fiction films, the various incarnations of Doctor Who, Stanley Kubrick’s A Clockwork Orange, and such 21st-century productions as 28 Days Later and Torchwood.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
1 HG Wells and Science Fiction Cinema
11
2 Aftermaths
28
3 The BBC Versus Science Fiction
40
4 Hammer Horror and Science Fiction
50
5 Robert Fuest and The Final Programme
60
6 Anything Can Happen in the Next HalfHour
73
7 Tracking UFO Format Text and Context
85
11 Expatriate Expatriate Doctor Who
128
12 Invasion of the BritSnatchers
143
13 A Cosy Catastrophe
156
14 Desiring the Doctor
167
15 Invaders from Space Time Travel and Omnisexuality
178
Chapter Notes
193
Select Bibliography
213
About the Contributors
217

8 A Clockwork Orange Exploitation and the Art Film
96
9 Visions of an English Dystopia
104
10 The Future of History in Dennis Potters Cold Lazarus
117

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About the author (2014)

Tobias Hochscherf is a professor of audio-visual media at University of Applied Sciences in Kiel, Germany. His research on European film and television culture has been widely published. James Leggott is a senior lecturer in film and television studies at Northumbria University, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England. He has published on various aspects of British film and television culture.

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