Biography of Eminent Men, Statesmen, Heroes, Authors, Artists, and Men of Science, of Europe and America ...: Part 2, Part 2

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Nafis and Cornish, 1840

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Page 122 - In vain, after these things, may we indulge the fond hope of peace and reconciliation. There is no longer any room for hope. If we wish to be free; if we mean to preserve inviolate those inestimable privileges for which we have been so long contending: if we mean not basely to abandon the noble struggle in which we have been so long engaged, and which we have pledged ourselves never to abandon, until the glorious object of our contest shall be obtained, we must fight! I repeat it, sir, we must fight!...
Page 123 - Gentlemen may cry, Peace, peace! — but there is no peace. The war is actually begun! The next gale that sweeps from the north will bring to our ears the clash of resounding arms ! Our brethren are already in the field! Why stand we here idle?
Page 111 - Whereas the Marquis de la Fayette out of his great zeal to the cause of liberty in which the United States are engaged, has left his family and connexions and at his own expense come over to offer his services to the United States without pension or particular allowance, and is anxious to risk his life in our cause — Resolved that his service be accepted, and that in consideration of his zeal, illustrious family and connexions, he have the rank and commission of major general in the army of the...
Page 201 - What though you have found no treasure, nor has any rich relation left you a legacy. Diligence is the mother of good luck, and God gives all things to industry. Then plough deep while sluggards sleep, and you shall have corn to sell and to keep.
Page 203 - I did not think that I should ever literally stand before kings, which, however, has since happened; for I have stood before five, and even had the honour of sitting down with one, the King of Denmark, to dinner.
Page 120 - Upon offering them to the house, violent debates ensued. Many threats were uttered, and much abuse cast on me, by the party for submission. After a long and warm contest, the resolutions passed by a very small majority, perhaps of one or two only. The alarm spread throughout America with astonishing quickness, and the ministerial party were overwhelmed. The great point of resistance to British taxation was universally established in the colonies. This brought on the war, which finally separated the...
Page 216 - ... they may take from me what I have ; they may, as they think, make me poor; but I will be happy. Before I sit down, I have one request to make to the house ; that when they come to decide upon my honour, they will not forget their own." The house rejected the motion against him, and resolved that " Lord Clive had rendered great and meritorious services to his country.
Page 270 - Ireland by the resources of his sense and his discretion. It is only the public situation which this gentleman holds which entitles me or induces me to say so much about him. He is a fly in amber, nobody cares about the fly ; the only- question is, How the devil did it get there...
Page 250 - In the court where we are now met, Cromwell twice sent a satirist on his tyranny to be convicted and punished as a libeller ; and in this court, almost in sight of the scaffold streaming with the blood of his sovereign, within hearing of the clash of his bayonets which drove out...
Page 202 - I conceiv'd my becoming a member would enlarge my power of doing good. I would not, however, insinuate that my ambition was not flatter'd by all these promotions; it certainly was; for, considering my low beginning, they were great things to me...

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